The Air Conditioning System: The Retrospective History and Overall Benefits

This innovation, once considered a luxury, is now necessary, allowing us to cool homes, businesses, hospitals, data centres, laboratories, and other buildings that are vital to our economy and to our everyday lives. In fact, air temperature is so critical to us that the effect of cooling and heating can account for 20% to 50% of energy used in homes.

Current commercial and residential air conditioning technology, like other significant breakthroughs, is the result of a series of developments by scientists and inventors who have challenged themselves to come up with innovative solutions to day-to-day problems.

A Brief History

In the 1840s, physicist and inventor Dr. John Gorrie of Florida suggested the concept of cooling cities to alleviate people of “high-temperature evils.” Gorrie claimed that cooling was the secret to preventing diseases such as malaria and making patients more comfortable. But his primitive method for cooling hospital rooms involved ice to be transported from the frozen lakes and streams in the lakes to Florida.

Gorrie started experimenting with the idea of artificial cooling to get around this costly logistic problem. He invented the machine that produced ice using a horse, water, wind-driven sails, or steam-powered compressor, and in 1851 was awarded a patent for it.

Willis Haviland Carrier, a professional engineer who began experimenting with the laws of humidity control. This is to majorly solve an application problem at a printing plant in Brooklyn, NY, that helped the invention of the first modern air-conditioner in 1902.

Borrowing from the principles of mechanical refrigeration developed in earlier years, Carrier’s machine sent air through coils filled with cold water. In 1933, an air conditioner was developed by the Carrier Air Conditioning Company of America using a belt-driven condensing unit and associated blower, mechanical controls, and evaporator coil, and this system became the industry standard.

The Change of the Game

Ever since its invention, cleaning and sanitising air conditioner units became a challenge to major industries. As our planet became warmer and warmer, more people purchased air conditioner units. This makes air conditioner units become not only a luxury, but a need.

Many market factors led to the slow rate of innovation in the air-conditioning (AC) industry, with consumer emphasis on low first cost as opposed to life-cycle costs being the main factor.

This led the AC industry to concentrate on economies of scale, resulting in a highly concentrated market. The AC manufacturers achieve high sales volumes by selling units to customers at low prices; the energy efficiencies of such units merely match or exceed the minimum energy efficiency requirements marginally.

The Importance of Air Conditioners and Breathing Healthy Air

With air conditioners, we can access cool or warm air to aid our comfort, health, and overall well-being. But how do we know if what we breathe is healthy?

Cleaning your air conditioner is vitally important, just like servicing your car.  If the filters are clogged and dirty, the natural airflow is impeded, making the machine work harder than it should. Therefore, when your evaporator coil is coated with mould, bacteria, dirt or dust, it is unable to provide your home with clean, hygienic air.

Air conditioning systems are expensive appliances from which you expect a great deal, especially in extreme heat. Maintaining clean air conditioning systems will reap many benefits for you, both in the short and the long term.

  • To Protect Your Health and Well-Being. Dirt and debris accumulate inside the unit with prolonged use. If your unit is not regularly cleaned, these accumulations will be released into your home and will affect your family’s health.
  • To Save Money. Filters, coils, and fins of an air conditioner require routine cleaning to make the unit work efficiently and effectively. Neglecting an annual clean will see a gradual decline in the efficiency and a rise in energy costs.
  • To Make Your Unit Last Longer. Eventually, leaving air conditioners working in a polluted state will lead to more significant problems and total failure. As the air conditioner unit collects more dust and debris, the unit is susceptible to overheating because the evaporator coils cannot work efficiently.

Overall, when our planet challenges us, we need a safe home to stay in where we can Breathe Healthy Air™. However, without a proper clean, this cannot be achieved.

At HydroKleen, we believe that a quality air conditioner clean and sanitise is imperative to supporting the air quality in your home. A dirty air conditioner will simply recycle the microbial pollutants throughout your home.

When you schedule an appointment with a HydroKleen technician, your employing a professional and your AC will be inspected, cleaned, and sanitized to ensure that it operates at optimum levels and that there are no underlying problems. Most importantly, your family will Breathe Healthy Air™!

You’ll be kept informed throughout the process and you will be given our industry-leading peace of mind Guarantee.  It’s an easy way to safeguard your investment and the comfort of your home, all with one simple step.

HydroKleen is the world leader in the cleaning and sanitization of ductless air conditioning systems. In fact, we invented the wet wash system and have been helping customers in over 40 countries Breathe Healthy Air™.

HydroKleen is proud to be the Exclusive Partner of National Asthma Council Australia’s Sensitive Choice Program.  HydroKleen’s cleaning system and cleaning agents have been tested and approved by a panel of experts.   HydroKleen – the only AC cleaning company in the National Asthma Council Australia’s Sensitive Choice program!

If you would like to join the leaders in the industry and start your own HydroKleen journey, please contact service@hydrokleen.com.au or call 07 5597 7749 for more information on the HydroKleen Business System. Australian franchises available.  Global licenses available.

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